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November 26, 2009

Live discussion sessions: Systemic Change

Our week 11 live session will be held here in elluminate at 4 pm, CST (time zone conversion)

Highlighted Resources

Response to Connectivism
Great session yesterday (I couldn't make it, but have reviewed the recordings) organized by CCK09 participants. The session was interactive with numerous short presentations (reactions) to connectivism (course and concept). As Eduardo states in this thread: "This was our real connectivism session, organized and facilitated by ourselves. Yes, let's have more short slide presentations, like today. We all learn: facilitators, presenters and attendees." , , November 25, 2009 [Link] [Tags: none] [Comment]

Contributions

Here's what course members from around the world had to say. Want to join the conversation? Submit your feed. Then put this at the beginning of your post: CCK09

Re: Comments and reflection on Elluminate Session on 25 Nov 09
by roy williams.  

Great session.  Many thanks again Frances for setting this one up and running with it, and thanks to everyone for a fascinating self-organised event.  Heli and Ailsa, thanks for showing us how it should be done, combining the aesthetics and so many other things with the 'cognitive' stuff. Less is more, Ailsa!

Complexity ...

Complex events are by definition unpredictable, so behaviourist? not.  Period.

The question is not whether some things are more or less predictable (large or small error bars, or standard deviations), but whether there are some things (many things in fact) which are quite unpredictable, because they are "complex" in CAST (complex adaptive systems theory) terms, not in the everyday sense of "complex".

So what is 'complex' -(in CAST)?

It consists of:

Self-organising systems (see Conway's Life), which may also be 

Self-reproducing (see computer viruses, biological viruses, and genes/memes/temes), which enjoy

Substantial degrees of freedom (see CCK08/09), and which are likely to produce

New, surprising, emergent events and properties, depending on the

Constraints in place in a particular context (see the comparison between CCK 08 and 09, and look at Twitter as a paradigm case study):

So... 

CCK08: no de jure constraints, at least one Troll on site, and with an implicit 'good behaviour' constraint in place, which is not made explicit, and which has no de facto effective sanctions, as the implicit constraint of modelling good behaviour didn't cut any ice with the Troll, nor was the 'Do not feed the trolls' (DNFTT) rule known to everyone in CCK08, and it certainly wasnt applied.

vs. CCK09: de facto constraints (Troll self-excluded), and implicit constraints (modelled good beviour).

The question is not whether there were any constraints and sanctions in place in 08 or 09.  There were constraints and sanctions in place in both.  There are two, linked questions:

1. What type of constraints best provide conditions for emergence?  In CAST terms, negative constraints, i.e. constraining what can NOT be done facilitates emergence, and, paradoxically, autonomy.  On the other hand, positive constraints, e.g. "you must do 3 assignments on the following topics, in text only, with references, against predetermined outcomes", are most likely going to exclude emergence. [So, does that mean we have to redesign our curricula, completely 'upside down'? Yes, and the design of CCK08/09 goes part of the way in designing 'courses' upside down for the same reason.]

 2. Constraints without sanctions are just hot air.  So what sanctions should be in place, and i) how can you avoid imposing them, by offering alternatives (diversions, etc), and ii) if you have to impose them, how will you go about doing so, to ensure that they are swift and effective? - And this means there is a 'you' in the picture, (singular or plural) 'you' cant be air-brushed out.  To put it plainly: 'freedom is conferrred -either by an authority, or by a consensus, but conferred it is'.

This is the simple (simplified) version.  Life online is more interesting and complicated than that, and one of the problems with the DNFTT rule was that the Troll was quite interesting at times, so it was difficult to know whether to apply it. 

And ...

Even under the most adverse conditions, emergence will out.  (See Blackmore [the temes link above] on why evolution is a 'must').

 

 

November 26, 2009

Re: Comments and reflection on Elluminate Session on 25 Nov 09
by ailsa haxell.  

Hi Gus, it seemed easy enough for me to bumble my way through...havent got used to the sound of my own voice though blush However, I have managed to put something up, it comes up with a cck search. Not sure i was at my most articulate, but its a site that I can certainly see has some potential. Thanks for bringing your knowledge of it into cck09, ailsa.

November 26, 2009

Re: Networks and Interaction.
by George Siemens.  

Hi Ailsa - just a quick point...I missed the elluminate discussion today, but listened to the recording. You asked an interesting question - and partly called me and Stephen out: "What have they learned from me?"

I do try to read every post in moodle and CCK09-tagged blogs. I learn significantly from course attendees. However, it's tough to respond to and track conversations (given my recent move, time has been a bit of a challenge for me this year). However, to answer your question: ANT has been one of my biggest take-aways for CCK09. I've read Latour in the past...but over the last two months or so, I've returned to his work (articles and books). For future offerings of CCK, I'll likely include discussion on Activity theory, ANT, and Connectivism. Mediation, technology, connections as base elements, etc. are interesting areas to explore. So, in that regard, your frequent references to ANT have been most valuable.

November 26, 2009

P2P Foundation » Blog Archive » Comparing our weightless economy with that of the foragers
Kudunomics refers to property rights for the information-based economy, the topic of a talk by Samuel Bowles. He looks at the foraging economy to understand the knowledge economy. (the Kudu is an antelope of some sort hunted in Tanzania for its massive caloric value. When one is killed, it’s widely shared, perhaps 2/3 outside of the [...] November 26, 2009

Discussion Forum

These links are comments posted to the Moodle Discussion Forum, Week 9, Week 10 and Week 11. If you want to participate in the discussion, but don't want to set up a blog, then you can post here.

Assignment #2
by Asako Yoshida.  

As Kerry & Richard posted, here is my link to Assignment #2.

http://asaginu.com/blog/?p=23

Asako

November 26, 2009

Short Paper #2 link
by Eva Brown.  

http://ebrownorama.wordpress.com/?p=24&preview=true

November 26, 2009

Paper 2
by Schalk Louw.  

Hi Guys

I posted my paper on blog:

http://schalkmlouw.blogspot.com/

Have a good one.

November 26, 2009

Re: Why research?
by roy williams.  

Hi, many thanks for asking all these questions!  You are on your way to becoming an excellent researcher (see below) ...

For me the simplest definition of research is:

A process for finding better questions.

Along the way, you might find some answers too, but that's a bonus, really. Lots of times all your research establishes is that an idea you had about how things work is wrong.  Now, that might be very disappointing at the time, but what you gain is that you then know that you have to find a different question to ask, or ask it about a different set of events.  That's the challenge, and where creativity is essential.  

Complexity ...

The short answer is, you can treat some events as predictable, and you can do your research on that basis.  This applies to social and natural science, the only difference is, most of the time the degree to which your results vary will be very small in natural science, and much larger in social science.

On the other hand, there are some events which you really cant treat as predictable, these are complex. The differerence, to put it simply, is that complex events are events that include self-organising (and sometimes self-reproducing) variables, or actors, with lots of freedom to act, and to communicate with many of the other actors.  Twitter is almost a paradigm case.

Complex events are not predictable, the only way to see what will happen is to 'run' the system - (Twitter for instance) and observe.  What you get  out of it as a researcher is what is called 'retrospective coherence' rather than prospective predictability.  Some of the most interesting work, particularly in corporate and social management, is the work of Snowden, see here for more details (and elsewhere on the same wiki).

November 26, 2009

Re: Would anyone be interested in designing and running some Cultural Academy workshops at Surrey University regarding learning networks and connecting?
by Eduardo Peirano.  


HI Nicola, I would like to contribute talking about PLE and PLN

November 26, 2009

Comments and reflection on Elluminate Session on 25 Nov 09
by Sui Fai John Mak.  

Thanks a lot Frances for organising the event, and Frances, Roy and Ulop for the facilitation.  Thanks George and Stephen for supporting us in this organisation of event.
I greatly enjoyed the session, especially with all of us - Leila, Eduardo, Heli, Roy and Ailsa and everybody else sharing in an enjoyable and relaxed environment.  You have made us all shine!
 
As this is our first self organised Elluminate Session (apart from the Visitors and Residence session by David), I reckon this is a great success, as we have all tried.  So congratulations to us all.
 
I think we could organise and conduct more sessions like this, so as to have more practice in both facilitation and presentation, on top of the discussion in the forum. 
 
Great learning for us, isn't it?
 
John

November 26, 2009

Re: Comments and reflection on Elluminate Session on 25 Nov 09
by Ulöp O'Taat.  

Hi John, I agree, that was fun to be involved with and the presenters all had great topics and presentations.  It is great that we were afforded this learning opportunity; hopefully there will be other opportunities going forward.

One thing I wanted to bring up before I forget:  After Roy's presentation there was a discussion in the chat room that led into comments about behaviourism, and constraints etc. The jist of it as I understood it was that Roy's proposition is that constraints are required in order for emergent knowledge to occur (or at least to increase the probability of it occurring, or conversely to reduce the probability of it not occurring).  Without constraints, trolls, operating in too much freedom, would act to inhibit the process of emergency.  I suggested this sounded like the b-word, and Ailsa remarked that cause-effect was not indicated in Roy's proposition.

However, is it not suggestive of a cause-effect relationship to propose that constraints are required in order to permit emergency?

November 26, 2009

Re: Comments and reflection on Elluminate Session on 25 Nov 09
by Eduardo Peirano.  

Thanks to all!! John, I agree with you. This was our real connectivism session, organized and facilitated by ourselves. Yes, let's have more short slide presentations, like today. We all learn: facilitators, presenters and attendees

November 26, 2009

Re: Comments and reflection on Elluminate Session on 25 Nov 09
by ailsa haxell.  

I was attempting to point out not that there was no cause /effect, but that it wasnt always anticipated, wasnt unidirectional, and so not as lineal as behaviourist (and many other approaches) approaches would see it. smile

November 26, 2009

Re: Comments and reflection on Elluminate Session on 25 Nov 09
by ailsa haxell.  

I'll try out voice threads to see if i can load what i presented today. Thanks for the facilitation, 'tis the first time I've attempted to present anything on elluminate, and it was easier than i anticipated, so thanks for the opportunity.

November 26, 2009

Re: Google Wave
by ailsa haxell.  

a really interesting quote from an Ant perspective. Here's a perfect example of how the social + technical shape each other. I can do this and more when i have access to that....but that cant do it by itself, it needs me to make it work.
We become socio-technical beings...cyborgs according to Donna Haraway, or Hybrids in Latours writings.
And the scientification of how to make it so, involves rhetoric, persuasions, seduction...which may or not be born out of realities as known, but selling ideas of futures possible.
For Ant theorists such as Callon, Google would be described as the obligatory passage point, a central node in the network.
There's problematizing- convincing others of the need to use this, it will sort everything, a new holy grail...creating itself as indispensable.
There's interresement, locking in other allies, forming alliances, getting people to do your marketing for you, inviting others in...weaning them away from earlier renditions or alternative forms

All the way through to performativity, for when we start talking of it here and there, this too helps strengthen its existence or reality in the world.

Google wave is doing all the steps that an ANT analysis associates with the building of a successful network.

November 26, 2009

Re: Comments and reflection on Elluminate Session on 25 Nov 09
by Gus Goncalves.  

Alisa,

let me know if you have any problems with the voicethreads process. I went ahead and subscribed to the "professional" version (for a fee) that allows us to use all of the "full features" of the service. 

Gus 

November 26, 2009

Re: Why research?
by Shaomeng Zhang.  

hi roy, thanks for the encouragement. My conceptual knowledge about academia is still chaotic, hopefully more order would emerge from this entropy...and in the process I could find more interesting question to ask.

November 26, 2009

Re: Comments and reflection on Elluminate Session on 25 Nov 09
by ailsa haxell.  

Hi Gus, it seemed easy enough for me to bumble my way through...havent got used to the sound of my own voice though blush However, I have managed to put something up, it comes up with a cck search. Not sure i was at my most articulate, but its a site that I can certainly see has some potential. Thanks for bringing your knowledge of it into cck09, ailsa.

November 26, 2009

Re: Comments and reflection on Elluminate Session on 25 Nov 09
by roy williams.  

Great session.  Many thanks again Frances for setting this one up and running with it, and thanks to everyone for a fascinating self-organised event.  Heli and Ailsa, thanks for showing us how it should be done, combining the aesthetics and so many other things with the 'cognitive' stuff. Less is more, Ailsa!

Complexity ...

Complex events are by definition unpredictable, so behaviourist? not.  Period.

The question is not whether some things are more or less predictable (large or small error bars, or standard deviations), but whether there are some things (many things in fact) which are quite unpredictable, because they are "complex" in CAST (complex adaptive systems theory) terms, not in the everyday sense of "complex".

So what is 'complex' -(in CAST)?

It consists of:

Self-organising systems (see Conway's Life), which may also be 

Self-reproducing (see computer viruses, biological viruses, and genes/memes/temes), which enjoy

Substantial degrees of freedom (see CCK08/09), and which are likely to produce

New, surprising, emergent events and properties, depending on the

Constraints in place in a particular context (see the comparison between CCK 08 and 09, and look at Twitter as a paradigm case study):

So... 

CCK08: no de jure constraints, at least one Troll on site, and with an implicit 'good behaviour' constraint in place, which is not made explicit, and which has no de facto effective sanctions, as the implicit constraint of modelling good behaviour didn't cut any ice with the Troll, nor was the 'Do not feed the trolls' (DNFTT) rule known to everyone in CCK08, and it certainly wasnt applied.

vs. CCK09: de facto constraints (Troll self-excluded), and implicit constraints (modelled good beviour).

The question is not whether there were any constraints and sanctions in place in 08 or 09.  There were constraints and sanctions in place in both.  There are two, linked questions:

1. What type of constraints best provide conditions for emergence?  In CAST terms, negative constraints, i.e. constraining what can NOT be done facilitates emergence, and, paradoxically, autonomy.  On the other hand, positive constraints, e.g. "you must do 3 assignments on the following topics, in text only, with references, against predetermined outcomes", are most likely going to exclude emergence. [So, does that mean we have to redesign our curricula, completely 'upside down'? Yes, and the design of CCK08/09 goes part of the way in designing 'courses' upside down for the same reason.]

 2. Constraints without sanctions are just hot air.  So what sanctions should be in place, and i) how can you avoid imposing them, by offering alternatives (diversions, etc), and ii) if you have to impose them, how will you go about doing so, to ensure that they are swift and effective? - And this means there is a 'you' in the picture, (singular or plural) 'you' cant be air-brushed out.  To put it plainly: 'freedom is conferrred -either by an authority, or by a consensus, but conferred it is'.

This is the simple (simplified) version.  Life online is more interesting and complicated than that, and one of the problems with the DNFTT rule was that the Troll was quite interesting at times, so it was difficult to know whether to apply it. 

And ...

Even under the most adverse conditions, emergence will out.  (See Blackmore [the temes link above] on why evolution is a 'must').

 

 

November 26, 2009

Re: Net Pedagogy and Acupuncture?
by Jane Brotchie.  

Funny how ideas pop up in different places. Nicola- do you remember we were wondering about connectivism and martial arts? The analogy with flow of chi through a network is worth exploring perhaps. But also there is an interesting model of teaching here. I went on a Tai Ji workshop last Saturday and I'm interested in the way newcomers (me) are looked after by seniors. Everyone is a learner - even those who have done it for decades still think of themselves as learners, but it becomes your responsibility to look after the newer people once you pass a certain level. In sharing you learn more by having to articulate and demonstrate what you know. I think this approach to sharing what you know has a lot to offer us and I thought this came through really well in Stephen Downes presentation this week.

November 26, 2009

Re: Networks and Interaction.
by roy williams.  

Maijann, I taught a form of Hallidayian functional linguistics for some years at the University of South Africa, mainly for media analysis. So I am a great enthusiast, although not a great expert.

I moved more into Foucauldian critical discourse analysis, but there is a lot of Halliday in my media analyis (http://k-m-etaphors.wikispaces.com/Discourse
- see the link under the 'Counting' section.

What I love about his work is that he provides all the tools for analysing language as a set of affordances, i.e. a radically 'parole' rather than 'langue' approach to linguisitcs. At the time I did my work on media I was using lots of semiotics, and a bit of linguistics, but without the affordances.

You might be interested in some of the work that has recently been done on affordances, particularly by Reed on 'indication' and 'predication', and by Costall and others. (See Affordances in the same wiki).

What is most pertinent to your comments about power analysis and social semiotics is the view of 'critical discourse analysis' (which is very Hallidayian) which uses 'discourse' as the unit of analysis of power, both individual and social. 

So the meaning is in the discourse, which is seen as a social semiotic: "a discourse is a set of texts and alliances that organises text and bodies within a particular community".  Not only the meaning, but also the power is articulated, contested, realigned, etc within the discourse. 

This is very different from the meaning is in the network, which doesnt do the same work for me at all - either epistemologically or ontologically, and certainly not in terms of the analysis of power. 

It (the meaning is in the discourse) is, of course, quite similar to an ANT formulation, which might be the meaning is in the assemblage, as the assemblage and the discourse are, in my mind, not too different.

November 26, 2009

Re: Networks and Interaction.
by Maijann Ruby.  

I don't agree, Roy.

November 26, 2009

Re: Networks and Interaction.
by ailsa haxell.  

And with Latour, the power to hold, create, align, detach...in networks is in the rhetoric. So yes, there are similarities Roy, however a major difference with my understanding of a discourse analysis is that Ant doesnt impose a metanarrative on top of what the actors themselves had to say. No God like view for myopic to detail antists.

November 26, 2009

Re: Networks and Interaction.
by George Siemens.  

Hi Ailsa - just a quick point...I missed the elluminate discussion today, but listened to the recording. You asked an interesting question - and partly called me and Stephen out: "What have they learned from me?"

I do try to read every post in moodle and CCK09-tagged blogs. I learn significantly from course attendees. However, it's tough to respond to and track conversations (given my recent move, time has been a bit of a challenge for me this year). However, to answer your question: ANT has been one of my biggest take-aways for CCK09. I've read Latour in the past...but over the last two months or so, I've returned to his work (articles and books). For future offerings of CCK, I'll likely include discussion on Activity theory, ANT, and Connectivism. Mediation, technology, connections as base elements, etc. are interesting areas to explore. So, in that regard, your frequent references to ANT have been most valuable.

November 26, 2009

Re: Networks and Interaction.
by ailsa haxell.  

Thanks for responding George, I felt that it was/is an important aspect of connectivism for learning to reflect a shared experience rather than a directed one. ailsa.

November 26, 2009

Re: Networks and Interaction.
by Maijann Ruby.  

Halliday's theory involves a metafunctional perspective rather than a metanarrative. An example of this type of approach is evident in O'Halloran's study titled 'Multimodal Analysis and Digital Technology'.

November 26, 2009

Re: Networks and Interaction.
by Stephen Downes.  

Ironically I have just finished reading "O'Halloran's study titled 'Multimodal Analysis and Digital Technology'." that was posted by Maijaan Ruby in this very forum - a great read, from which I learned a lot. I don't keep track of who taught me what but it's pretty easy for me to say that I am learning from this course.

November 26, 2009

Re: Networks and Interaction.
by roy williams.  

Ailsa, sure, Latour's radical scepticism and his insistence on re-assembling the social again and again is what draws me to ANT.

However, the patterns that Halliday (and others, Foucault and more) finds in the unconscious use of patterned speech, pictures, tone of voice, etc, etc, are powerful patterns, and they too 'connect', even if spectrally, across the ways people articulate how they re-assemble the social tomorrow and tomorrow (etc).

So there are very strong patterns/resonances, and semiotically and linguisitcally, they persist, they dont fade away entirely, both as semiotics and meta-semiotics. [Which is partly why I wrote a response to Latour's Nature and Politics piece, in Theory and Psychology, some time back].

I am not sure that ANT has a name for these persistent patterns, 'discourse' does for me, although I dont think there is a common currency notion of 'discourse' out there, so maybe its time to look for a new name for 'strongly resonant patterns' across the activities of re-assemblage.

Question: OK, Bruno, so there is no such thing as the 'social', but what about 'culture'?

Latour's early piece on Einstein did have a neat conception of 'frames', which I then took to be 'linked' frames, but would now explore more in terms of 'resonant' frames. These resonances are at an interesting level, material (sounds, tones, colours, fragrances, forms), and the way they resonate across frames (OK, assemblages of frames) - what is that?

November 26, 2009

Twitter

Post in Twitter and use the hashtag #cck09 to be listed here. (These should be fresh. Still working on improving the Twitter display.)

Starting Responses to Connectivism (v participative) in Elluminate in abt 30 mins http://bit.ly/8JzRK more here http://bit.ly/7CKVE0 #CCK09


Waiting for the Elluminate session with @francesbell and other "classmates" from #cck09


Ready for our connectivism Elluminate session http://bit.ly/8JzRK, #cck09


Ready for our connectivism Elluminate session http://bit.ly/8JzRK, #cck09


right now. RT: @emapey: Ready for our connectivism Elluminate session http://bit.ly/8JzRK, #cck09


"our connectivism session" is right now. NICE listening to peers in session #cck09


Talking about positive effects of constraints in networks (like twitter or sms number of characters limit) on our elluminate session #cck09


Beautiful contribution of Heli on #cck09 session: "Finding your own voice is the goal" http://helistudies.edublogs.org/


example of a great conference that encourages participation: @gsiemens @ RT @emapey http://bit.ly/5PZ8RX #cck09


Terminó mi presentación en inglés en Elluminate para CCK09 Estoy satisfecho. Creo que me fue bien aunque todavía devo mejorar mucho


Mi presentación en Elluminate, una experiencia para no olvidar: micro no funcionaba, tuve que hacerla por chat. De todo se aprende #cck09


LearnTrends 2009 recordings #CCK09 http://icio.us/bcmyfs


Comments and reflection on Elluminate Session on 25 Nov 09, http://bit.ly/8WU7kx #cck09


teacher fired for using blogs w/ class via Leila in #CCK09 session yesterday. http://tinyurl.com/yhngj3d transl: http://tinyurl.com/yl4mcn9


RT @anitsirk: teacher fired for using blogs w/ class via Leila in #CCK09 session yesterday. http://tinyurl.com/yhngj3d transl: http://ti ...


Up early to do hw and then the deep clean really begins. Its great to be able to read links in the #CCK09 daily & not just scan them :)


@francesbell I like the ideas about changes in teaching but it also means changing the whole institution .assessment/accreditation #cck09


Groups and Networks discussion revisited in xtranormal mashup video starring @LisaMlane @Downes @a1lsa http://bit.ly/7nUE6Z #CCK09


RT @francesbell: Groups & Networks discussion revisited in xtranormal mashup video w/ @LisaMlane @Downes @a1lsa http://bit.ly/7nUE6Z #CCK09


Blogged about Groups and Networks with added video- cast of many #CCK09


Blogged about Groups and Networks with added video- cast of many http://bit.ly/4xpFlU #CCK09


RT @francesbell: Blogged about Groups and Networks with added video- cast of many http://bit.ly/4xpFlU #CCK09


RT @francesbell: Blogged about Groups and Networks with added video- cast of many http://bit.ly/4xpFlU #CCK09


@DavidCRoberts Have you seen my xtranormal vid? Blogged about Groups and Networks with added video- cast of many http://bit.ly/4xpFlU #CCK09


My 2nd paper for #CCK09 : http://bit.ly/8ydK5Q


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