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The Daily

November 6, 2009

Highlighted Resources

Against Transparency
Toward the end of our live session yesterday, Stephen referenced this article by Lawrence Lessig. It's a bit long, but does provide an interesting perspective on ways in which transparency could be negative: "How could anyone be against transparency? Its virtues and its utilities seem so crushingly obvious. But I have increasingly come to worry that there is an error at the core of this unquestioned goodness. We are not thinking critically enough about where and when transparency works, and where and when it may lead to confusion, or to worse. And I fear that the inevitable success of this movement--if pursued alone, without any sensitivity to the full complexity of the idea of perfect openness--will inspire not reform, but disgust."
Lawrence Lessig, , November 5, 2009 [Link] [Tags: none] [Comment]

Recording: Discussion - Openness and Transparency
During our live session this week, we had the pleasure of chatting with Alan Levine (the recording is listed under week 8). I enjoyed the session. Topics of blogging, openness, learning, teaching, privacy, security, etc. were addressed. , , November 5, 2009 [Link] [Tags: none] [Comment]

Contributions

Here's what course members from around the world had to say. Want to join the conversation? Submit your feed. Then put this at the beginning of your post: CCK09

CCK09 Social Media Revolution
This is a very interesting video on the Social Media Revolution posted by suifaijohnmak in the CCK09 Moodle Forum. Another recommended is also to The Power of Social Networking is Infinite. November 6, 2009

Re: Power to the People
by Asako Yoshida.  

As Francis was characterizing the discussion about networks or network as essentialist, if everything was reduced to the physical characteristics of the network, then it would lose all the contextual information and how the network and the power within it operate. Even what we are observing is characteristically a network or networking of people, it hardly guarantees an open, democratic, innovative and adaptive configuration. The idea of openness has to be contextualized in order to understand how the nature of openness within a given situation or context helped organize something better. Unless we can pinpoint how power operates in a specific situation, the power remains somewhat abstract and we cannot explain what effects it has over the members of the network and how the network works. Asako

November 5, 2009

Discussion Forum

These links are comments posted to the Moodle Discussion Forum, Week 8. If you want to participate in the discussion, but don't want to set up a blog, then you can post here.

Re: Openness
by Asako Yoshida.  

It's our social roles and circumstances that shape how we deliver our messages and interact with the rest. I think it's a complex mix of a given social context and individuals as agents and a network of meanings, events, and accidental happenings. We can focus on the individuals who as agents make things happen or change the overall direction; and we can also focus on the social context, organizations, or culture which influence the outcomes of the individual actions.

Asako

November 6, 2009

Re: Fear of Googled Past
by Lisa Lane.  

One of my students replied to this concern once by saying, "Yeah? Well by then my boss will have his beer photos in Facebook too!"

We all choose what to keep private and what to put on the web. I don't think that's a false persona, just a web persona. I keep a lot of things private in person too.

The schools are warning students now to watch out due to future employement issues. I haven't figured out what I think about that yet. Youthful indiscretions have always haunted people -- it's just we have photos of them posted now. Since we didn't have photos posted then, does that mean that it was less real, when what our stupid actions were simply bandied about among our friends? or, at the celebrity level, published in someone else's memoir?

Maybe we're just afraid that more people can see our stupidity than ever before. But the kids who've grown up with this stuff don't have an "ever before". They're not going to see the problem as that serious, and if my student is correct, who will care?

November 6, 2009

Re: Fear of Googled Past
by Frances Bell.  

We , and our students, can simultaneously live in the world and try to change it. Being a pragmatist, I would never encourage anyone (including myself) to sacrifice an important part of their life (like their employability) to a principle, without being really sure that it was worth it. If universities and employers were rational and sensible, then we could hope that they would ignore indiscretions and look for the qualities they want in their graduates/ employees but unfortunately, stories like the one Chris Sessums told us remind us that rationality and sense can be scarce commodities.
Another approach is to 'manage' your digital identity: to keep the silly stuff within groups of friends, and when that doesn't work, push it off the front page of your search with your own presence.

November 6, 2009

Re: Intellectual Products
by Gillian Watson.  

I also struggle with similar feelings Kerry. But I do feel like often we miss great opportunities to further a concept or work by keeping it behind walls.
I don't really know if there is an easy way to solve this. I wonder though if what needs to happen is a rethinking of the word "value"?

November 6, 2009

Re: Fear of Googled Past
by Gillian Watson.  

Agreed! I want to be open and honest with my employer because it is way more difficult living up to an unrealistic image.
I wonder if this concern about making a fool of ourselves comes from the idea that we are experts? We have tried in the past to become the expert and everyone knows that the expert doesn't have those nasty skeletons in the closet, or they at least keep them well hidden.

November 6, 2009

Re: How the internet enables intimacy and openness?
by Sui Fai John Mak.  

How about this P eace for Mankind , Sound of MusicT-mobile dance and No pants Subway Ride 2009?

What do you think are the similarities and differences in the videos?

What are the implications of such connections and networking on education and learning?

November 6, 2009

Re: Fear of Googled Past
by Old Socs.  

It is a sad world, virtual or otherwise, when one cannot be themselves without fear of recrimination or refusal of access to services, occupations etc. Pragmatism does sound a little like fear though. What ever became of principle?

November 6, 2009

Re: Transparency
by Old Socs.  

What One grows? What degree of openness is required for growth?


November 6, 2009

Re: How the internet enables intimacy and openness?
by Sui Fai John Mak.  

In this Next 5,000 days of the web, some interesting points were raised.

Total personalisation, total transparency.

With the Web and Internet:

Smarter, more personalized, more Ubiquitous.

To share is to gain.  We are the Web.

November 6, 2009

Re: How the internet enables intimacy and openness?
by Old Socs.  

Do you believe those predictions?

November 6, 2009

Transparency
by A One.  

One grows through openness

November 5, 2009

Re: Fear of Googled Past
by Christy Tucker.  

Rereading that post this morning made me smile; thank you for reminding me of it. I'm much more interested in being transparent. I'd rather present myself to an employer as I actually am than pretend I'm someone else. If I pretend, what's the best that can happen? I get hired for some job--but it's a bad fit because they hired some fantasy person that isn't really me.

In one of my previous jobs, part of our interview process was aimed at trying to find out how people dealt with problems. I remember one woman with eight years of instructional design experience who claimed she had never had a project fall behind in schedule and had never worked with anyone with a "challenging" personality. We kept trying to give her opportunities to talk about how she solved problems, but I think she thought we were asking trick questions to get her to admit she wasn't perfect. We didn't hire her; we could tell how she'd respond when things went wrong. Maybe she really did have a perfect track record--but we couldn't guarantee that everything would be perfect in our team. We wanted someone who could recover from a mistake, and she couldn't prove to us that she'd ever done so. That same kind of fear of being open prevented her from getting the job, even though her instructional design samples were good.

I'd rather hire someone who I know genuinely is the person they appear to be, and I'd rather be hired by someone who approaches it the same way.

November 5, 2009

Networks and Interaction.
by Maijann Ruby.  

Halliday (1978, p. 16) asserts that 'in the psychological sphere, there have been two alternative lines of approach to the question of language development including the 'nativist' and 'environmental' positions. In particular, Halliday (1978, p. 17) states that

'the nativist model reflects the philosophical-logical strand in the history of thinking about language, with it's sharp distinction between the ideal and real (which Chomsky calls 'competence' and 'performance') and its view of language as rules - essentially rules of syntax. The environmentalist represents the ethnographic tradition, which rejects the distinction of ideal and real, defines what is grammatical as, by and large, what is acceptable, and sees language as a resource - resource for meaning, meaning defined in terms of function. To this extent the two interpretations are complementary rather than contradictory; but they have tended to become associated with conflicting psychological theories and thus to be strongly counterposed'.

Furthermore, Halliday (1978, p.17) asserts that 'a functional theory is not a theory about the mental processes involved in the learning of the mother tongue; it's a theory about the social processes involved'. In this perspective, 'language is a form of interaction, and it is learnt through interaction'.

In Halliday's (1978, p. 39) social-functional view 'the key concept is that of realization, language as multiple coding. Halliday states (1978, p. 40)

'I would use the term network for all levels, in fact: semantic network, grammatical network, phonological network. It refers simply to a representation of the potential of that level. A network is a network of options, of choices; so for example the semantic system is regarded as a set of options. If we go back to the Hjelmslevian (originally Saussurean) distinction of paradigmatic and the syntagmatic, most of modern linguistic theory has given priority to the syntagmatic concept. Lamb treats the two axes together: for him a linguistic stratum is a network embodying both syntagmatic and paradigmatic relations all mixed up together, in patterns of what he calls AND nodes and OR nodes. I take out the paradigmatic relations (Firth's system) and give priority to these; for me the underlying organization at each level is paradigmatic. Each level is a network of paradigmatic relations, of ORs - a range of alternatives, in the sociological sense. This is what I mean by a potential: the semantic system is a network of meaning potential'.

Halliday, M.A.K. (1978). Language as social semiotic: the social interpretation of language and meaning. Edward Arnold: London.

November 5, 2009

Re: Power to the People
by roy williams.  

Dear One, how can I apply for a different allocation of power from the network, if I'm not happy with what I've got?

(more than one sentence answers please - of you can cheat, and just make it a long sentence).

November 5, 2009

Food for Worms
by A One.  

Ask and it shall be given unto you

November 5, 2009

Re: Power and Authority in Education
by Leila Nachawati.  

I´ve found the post very interesting too, Geoff, especially this statement: "We need strong support systems and parallel learning structures for all the innovators of the current school system in order to balance the immune system reaction of the old system." There´s definitely such need for support systems. Otto speaks about switching from a 2.0 to a 3.0 approach and that sounds like a not-so-unfriendly scenario to me. I guess in other countries most institutional structures have yet to switch to 2.0, I´d say Spain is one of them. The more certain individuals and sectors evolve into 3.0 (or whatever comes next), the bigger the gap between them and public institutions reticent to change.

November 5, 2009

Re: Power to the People
by Asako Yoshida.  

As Francis was characterizing the discussion about networks or network as essentialist, if everything was reduced to the physical characteristics of the network, then it would lose all the contextual information and how the network and the power within it operate. Even what we are observing is characteristically a network or networking of people, it hardly guarantees an open, democratic, innovative and adaptive configuration. The idea of openness has to be contextualized in order to understand how the nature of openness within a given situation or context helped organize something better. Unless we can pinpoint how power operates in a specific situation, the power remains somewhat abstract and we cannot explain what effects it has over the members of the network and how the network works. Asako

November 5, 2009

Twitter

Post in Twitter and use the hashtag #cck09 to be listed here. (These should be fresh. Still working on improving the Twitter display.)

RT @gsiemens: We've forced @cogdog to reflect on his Amazing Stories of openness here: http://tinyurl.com/yd8e6jn #CCK09


Chatting about @dlnorman "how do you connect to people online" http://bit.ly/1Eg5A2 in CCK09


Joining today's cck09 session on openness and transparency.. a bit late as usual


#iLikeThis:: Chatting about @dlnorman "how do you connect to people online" http://bit.ly/1Eg5A2 in CCK09 via @gsiemens Its good!


@gsiemens has a gun to my head, forcing me to speak in Elluminiate for #CCK09. Revenge shall be mine!


@cogdog but, we thank you for contributing. I'm quite enjoying this session #CCK09


@cogdog thanks for stopping in - great session! #CCK09


Sad that I missed the CCK09 elluminate again! But happy to be thinking about openness and catching up on Moodle posts.


@willrich45 2 Elluminate classes (1 for credit, other #CCK09), created a Twitter workshop (#Tclass) & brought 4 into fold, blog posts


@cogdog :-) great sharing #CCK09


P eace to mankind http://bit.ly/1LYph Are these people (us) networked? What are the implications? #CCK09


Education, learning & social networking in special way? http://bit.ly/Cbuyy #CCK09


Compare networked learning with this "lecture" of Yale University http://bit.ly/2qNffj #CCK09


Not science has shown, but this experiment, this effect has shown (Richard Feynman) http://bit.ly/2qNffj #CCK09


Trying to think of new ways to connect with CCK09!


Hopping from #cck09 Elluminate session to #NITLE session


Empowering Professional Openness...Terry Anderson http://editlib.org/view/33044 #cck09


"In transparent teaching we expose ourselves as learners" (@francesbell in @vandrcck09 session #CCK09


@romieh you were so right. I missed @daveowhite for #moralmaze. big mistake #cck09


@daveowhite the boy done good! great session at #CCK09 Elluminate


@francesbell Thanks :) It was a fun session #CCK09


@daveowhite @francesbell Agreed on both counts - good and fun #CCK09


RT @edwebb: @daveowhite @francesbell Agreed on both counts - good and fun #CCK09 I do agree also! Thanks again Dave and others, sia


@daveowhite Thanks Dave. A great session, lots of fun & discussion. #CCK09


@helinur I enjoyed it too, seeing you there #CCK09


@dustcube As you created the vandrcck09 you have complete control of how it works #CCK09 others need to follow


recording: @davewhite presentation: http://bit.ly/Ws2fE CCK09


Fwd @gsiemens: recording: @davewhite presentation: http://bit.ly/Ws2fE CCK09...*just finishing archived prez - well worth the hour-plus*


catching up with cck09.. slowly but strongly


This talk by Carl Wieman (Nobel Prize winner) posted lots of challenges http://bit.ly/3Y8ayt #CCK09


Visitors and Residents Elluminate with details in OLDaily http://bit.ly/2JdxO8 All are welcomed #CCK09


Just rammed my Visitors and Residents Prezi into a Power Point for tomorrows #CCK09 elluminate session.


@daveowhite sounds painful and regressive - need Flash integration in elluminate #CCK09


@edwebb It's the price I pay for being 'cutting edge' :) #CCK09


Role of "teachers" in "networks?" Adding complexity to the thought process by revisiting Nell Noddings info http://bit.ly/1U4dZH #cck09


@markgr Wow, we really _are_ all connected! Have not been able to do #CCK09 as much as I'd like but have learned a ton from the resources.


@NicolaAvery yes, thank you! now wondering if it's remotely possible to catch up with cck09!


Watching and listening to Amazing Stories of Openness for CCK09 http://cogdogblog.com/stuff/opened09/ Lovely and inspiring


mmcisaac great @stoweboyd video http://tinyurl.com/yg3or67 from 140 character conference. Social business, shared time & space #CCK09


Tensions people/inst. Democratisation of intimacy http://bit.ly/2gVYVo #CCK09


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